The Knowledge Vault Newsletter Sign-up >>>

 

Posts Tagged ‘rising interest rates’

Slow Moving Bear

October 9th, 2018 by Kurt L. Smith

Having a plan and executing it can be worthwhile in a market in which yields on almost all bonds are rising and their prices are falling. Three quarters into 2018 and yields are up and prices are down on almost all kinds of bonds and across all maturities.

Take a look at this month’s featured municipal bond issue, Eagle Pass, TX, below, and compare it to January’s yields. Yields are higher across all maturities, from short-term to long-term, of at least one half of one percent.  Higher yields mean lower bond prices but yet that message is not is not making a huge dent in performance.  The reason is speed.  Yes, interest rates are up but the speed of change has not had an appreciable negative effect on bond market performance.

Looking at municipal bond indexes we see this.  The S&P Municipal Bond Index is essentially unchanged from January 1st.  Same for the Bloomberg Barclays Municipal Intermediate to Short Total Return Index or their US Municipal Bond Index for that matter (all per Bloomberg).  Check your favorite yardstick and compare.  The reason this is so is because the interest earned so far has been keeping up with principal (price) loss. (more…)

Capitulation

June 14th, 2017 by Kurt L. Smith

It is not often that followers of the all-too-staid bond markets get to use the word capitulation. Usually things don’t move fast enough (or far enough) to warrant the use of the word. We, however, having declared the end of a three decades long trend, see a significant change taking place.

We marked late 2012 as the end of the bull market in Bonds, though the hockey-stick final mania in the longest maturing bonds didn’t occur until last spring, culminating July 6, 2016. Shorter term bond yields had risen since 2012 while the 10 year US Treasury bottomed at 1.32%, a significant turning point in trend.

The second half of 2016 saw yields spike to 2.64%, such that by year-end (December 2016 Letter) we called for a correction of this first move in the long-term bear market for long-term bonds. Indeed yields moderated back down to 2.13% early in June. So far so good and right along our projected path.

Which brings us to today. Actually it was a June 9th Bloomberg headline that used Capitulation, saying “Investors betting on rising bond yields just threw in the towel in a big way, according to Bank of America.” Citing the “biggest inflows to bonds in well over two years”, BofA concluded the performance of credit equities are “highly correlated.” (more…)

Rates Rise; Who Cares?

March 8th, 2017 by Kurt L. Smith

These are heady times in the stock market. As market indexes set historical all-time highs, who cares about bonds? Stocks are all the buzz.

Back in August my letter was First Bonds, Now Stocks. “If you liked the bond market rally this year, then I think you will really enjoy the stock market rally which appears to be gathering steam.” Gather it has. The Dow Jones Industrial Average traded at 17,063 on June 27th, 2016; on March 1st, 2017 it was 21,169 for a 24% rise.

Meanwhile the bubble on Bonds did indeed burst as ten year Treasury yields bottomed at 1.32% on July 6, 2016, before doubling to 2.64% on December 15th. So while stocks were gaining steam, bond prices were indeed weakening as yields doubled. As the Dow rallied, ten year Treasury bonds sank, producing an 11% price loss into the December yield highs. The long bellwether Treasury bond was down 22% in price over the same period.

Both the rise in stock prices and the fall in Bond prices were expected. After bond prices bottomed in December we expected prices to bounce and indeed the bounce appears to be over such that prices are trending lower again as the yield on the ten year treasury is back over 2.50%.

January’s Letter, Lines In the Sand noted Big Bill Gross’s line at 2.60% for the ten year treasury.  At just over 2.50% as March begins, we are within striking distance. (more…)

Another Step Closer

March 3rd, 2016 by Kurt L. Smith

Markets go up and markets go down.  We all know this.  We should also know that we are fortunate to live in an era in which markets have trended higher for decades.  Unfortunately we now live in an age of asset bubbles with the largest bubbles of all, Stocks and Bonds, on the verge of a massive popping.

We have watched the popping of two asset bubbles over the past several years: According to Bloomberg, Precious Metals (Gold & Silver) and Oil.  Gold peaked in September 2011 at $1920 an ounce, falling 45% over the following four years to a $1046 low.  Silver almost touched $50 an ounce for the second time in its history and sold off to below $14.  Oil peaked at $147 in 2008 but sold at $107 just nineteen months ago and below $27 last month.  Markets do go up and down, but in today’s age of asset bubbles, one must be ever mindful of the tremendous downside risks that exist. (more…)

The Trend Is Not Your Friend

November 11th, 2015 by Kurt L. Smith

Investors look to the Federal Reserve for economic leadership.  Looking backward, one might say the Fed helped get the economy back on track with lower interest rates, higher asset prices and lower unemployment.  Looking forward, the Fed continues to feed us the line that next month or next quarter will be better. (more…)

NEWS FEED

The $247 trillion global debt bomb washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-2…